Lobsters: A Love Story

“So, have you guys ever considered using wool, silk, hemp, more linen, angora, cashmere, mohair, Tencel® (rayon), milk fiber (rayon), bamboo (rayon), soy (rayon)?"

This is perhaps the one question we are asked on an almost daily basis and the answer to it is well, yes, we have considered and tested all of those fibers and then some. 

However, we have been having a long and torrid love affair with cotton. We love cotton. We know cotton.  We consider our innovative weave structures developed by Bethanne at The Oriole Mill sophisticated, surprising, and complex.  We enjoy changing the wrapping properties of a textile based on the manipulation of weave structure and density; we consider this a challenging test when done consistently in cotton.

Although we love cotton, we also have a great interest in other fibers. Our due diligence is fairly involved and lengthy and if a fiber passes that stage, it moves into research and development, which is also a long stage. We tend to take our time and mull things over and although there is a constant push in fashion to push the edge and stay relevant, we prefer to be slow and deliberate when it comes to decisions concerning our children. We want to know where our fibers are sourced, we want to know their history, we want them to offer unique and relevant wearing qualities, we want them to croon to us songs of their youth. We want our fibers to seduce us.  We want to stay as natural as possible. We want our customer to be able to trust that when she selects a Pavo to wrap the most precious thing on Earth, she knows it is safe both in integrity and design. 

We have been looking at various woolens for the past two years and nothing was quite right; it either wasn’t strong enough to hold together well during the weaving process, wasn’t soft enough, or we were not able to fully follow the supply chain to our liking. The process was slow and frustrating, but we persevered and finally found wool that met our requirements. An order went in and I left Erin to do her magic. And this happened: 

There is so much I could say about Lobsters, but really he needs no introduction. I mean, look! 

But I suppose a little context might be of use. Lobsters came into creation around the same time as Ama, Aquaria and Sea Star. Every design has its place within a larger story and while Aquaria and Sea Star are lovely companions to Ama, the family was not yet complete. Enter Lobster. 

Go big or go home, right? We wanted lobsters on our wrap. A fitting and proud nod to Pavo East. We needed to go big because if we did not, what really was the point? Lobsters needed to be the perfect funky, weird foil to our beloved Ama. Lobster went through a number of iterations (including a sad shrimpish phase) and he was finally ready for the loom at the same time as our red wool. What better combination than Lobsters and red wool? Right? It is the perfect pairing. As Erin mentioned, "Nothing says winter in New England like red wooly lobsters." 

We spend so much time with our wraps, it is second nature for them to take on their own personalities and their own stories. They function within their own space.  Whenever I see Ama and her crew, I see a band of crazy, loud beatniks on the cusp of great change. I see a group of friends driving from Greenwich Village to as far west as they are able to go and finally coming to rest in North Beach, thousands of miles from home, but still right where they want to be. For me, Lobsters is that group's Kerouac. Wild-eyed, full of crazy movement and space, bristly, edgy, and absolutely perfect. Yep, Lobsters is definitely that.